December 18, 2014

Reggae Revolution on the Rise in Topanga, August 16

 

While in Jamaica working on his next album, Julian Marley, who will be performing at Reggae ‘Pon the Mountain, August 16, took the time to connect with California-based photojournalist, Kristie Akin (kristieakin.blogspot.com; #Love and Photograph).

She shares her photographs and some of Marley’s views on life, the Rastafarian Movement, the deep-rooted message in reggae music, and what fans can look forward to in the very near future, with Messenger readers. (For more photographs: topangamessenger.com).


When asked how he felt about coming to the west coast, Julian Marley complimented community members:

PHOTO BY KRISTIE AKIN

Reggae Revolution on the Rise in Topanga, August 16

Julian Marley will headline at Reggae ‘Pon the Mountain at the Topanga Community Club on August 16.

“We always love coming to California… always great vibes, good inspiration, good people, and on the west side everybody got the vibes…always an enjoyment to come there.”

He assured fans they would be hearing their favorite tracks from his previous albums as well as some of his father, Bob Marley’s songs during his performances.

Upon the release of Julian’s latest album, still in progress, fans can look forward to fresh sounds, formulated with Marley’s reggae roots, as well as the sounds that stem from his roots in England where he was raised.

“It take you through a likkle trip.” he says of his music, having created a fusion of high energy, uplifting, positive sounds and conscious lyrics.

“It’s always conscious. It’s always conscious in the sense of, even if we speak of love, it’s conscious…. Nothing of any kind of negativity, it’s very positive. If it sounds like it’s going negatively, there is something positive after that. It’ll never leave you in darkness. “

It is precisely that consciousness that crafts the sounds, serving as deliverers of Marley’s combined efforts to share the spirit in reggae music and to continue to spread the message it stands for.

“When you come to see I, you’re picking up that spirit. It’s a Godly Spirit. The Spirit of Freedom, Spirit of Unity and Love… Take it in, deep inside to your soul and let it resonate…I sing a song and even when I go home and go to sleep, you might still be thinking about the song, it might still be resonating in you, and hopefully, you tell your brethren of that unity and love. “

Legendary icon for the Rastafari Movement, Robert “Bob” Nesta Marley, introduced the world to the concept of global unity and love, through his music and activism across the globe.

Spoken like the son of a prophet, Julian explained how reggae music is created for the people.

“The music we make, as we say, is the people’s music. Reggae music is the music of the oppressed, suffering people. It is a mental thing, oppression is mental and if it stays on the mind, it’s going to weigh you down. Have to be strong.”

More than 30 years have passed since the last creation of a song from Bob Marley.

Still today, his music remains ever prevalent and more relevant than ever. Even in current times, humanity is facing struggles that reflect the same issues as many of the lyrics in reggae songs written decades ago.

“Fact is, these are the harder days, but God will see you through. Here’s how I look at life, sometimes we say things is rough, but every day you eat something, every day you drink something. So, some way, God bring you through. Some people live to be one hundred, and very poor, yet God bring dem through.”

In the song “One Drop,” Bob Marley sings about the generation gap and filling that gap. During his interview, Julian described the meaning of the generation gap similarly to a period in time in the world when the expansion of general positivity, unity, love and freedom, are in a form of silence.

Julian affirms, “That gap is filled now. The generation has come. That gap is when you don’t hear the sounds of certain things. Until the people grow, like when a child become a man, then he can go up on the road and do some works…Yeah, the gap is filled now.”

The deep-rooted message of universal love in reggae music is what makes it such a powerful and captivating audible. Offering a lyrical, spiritual guide for humanity, reggae music is the teaching of a way to live life in peace, with love, maintaining a global balance, sustainable for all living things.

“Anywhere you are in the world, it [reggae music] speaks. It speaks for you!” says Julian as he reveals the answer to maintaining balance. “There are some people growling amongst themselves; they should be taking in the music and that spirit… We maintain our balance because we are on Earth. The Earth is a fullness thereof created by the Almighty. No matter where I go, I’m grounded because I have knowledge and, being a child of God, I am grounded, not easily thrown off. We live in the world. Because we know the world, we are not frightened, we know what the world is. Got to hold your ground. Keep you inside of you. Keep being yourself, that’s how it go!” says Julian “JuJu” Marley.

Julian Marley & The Uprising will perform at Label 27’s Fifth Annual “Reggae ‘Pon the Mountain,” at the Topanga Community Club, August 16. For tickets and information: reggaeonthemountain.eventbrite.com; reggaeponthemountain.org.

Marley shares the bill with Black Uhuru and several other reggae bands.

For more information on Julian Marley visit the official website: julianmarley.com. For more information on the Rastafarian Movement: bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/rastafari/.