July 30, 2014

National Park Service Seeking Volunteers to Connect Young People with the Outdoors

 

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

National Park Service Seeking Volunteers to Connect Young People  with the Outdoors

Students from Los Angeles Unified School District touch and smell California sagebrush, native to the Santa Monica Mountains.

THOUSAND OAKS, CA—The National Park Service is seeking volunteers with an interest in helping young people discover the beauty and history of the Santa Monica Mountains. The deadline to submit an application is September 14.

“Our education programs wouldn’t be possible without volunteers,” said Barbara Applebaum, supervisory park ranger for education programs at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. “It’s a really special opportunity to connect students to the outdoors and learn more about the mountains at the same time.”

Applebaum is looking for volunteers who can commit one or two weekdays per week starting this October. The programs take place at park sites in Newbury Park, Agoura Hills and Malibu.

Although prior experience is not necessary, a strong desire to work with young people is required. Volunteers will become an integral part of an environmental education team that works outdoors with elementary, middle and high school students. National Park Service training will be held the week of October 21.

For more information, please contact Barbara Applebaum at (805) 370-2304 or samo_education@nps.gov. Applications can also be downloaded at http://www.nps.gov/samo/supportyourpark/volunteer.htm.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area (SMMNRA) is the largest urban national park in the country, encompassing more than 150,000 acres of mountains and coastline in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. A unit of the National Park System, it comprises a seamless network of local, state and federal parks interwoven with private lands and communities. As one of only five Mediterranean ecosystems in the world, SMMNRA preserves the rich biological diversity of more than 450 animal species and 26 distinct plant communities. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/samo.